“Relaxis has been amazingly helpful.” – Deb B.

Deb loves the great outdoors, and her adventures have taken her biking, kayaking, snow-shoeing, skiing, camping, traveling the U.S. and worldwide, along with theater and symphony viewing at home. But over time, her RLS symptoms gradually became more severe, eroding her peace of mind and interfering with some of the activities she enjoyed most. “When I tell people I have Restless Legs Syndrome, they usually say ‘Yes… so?’ because they don’t understand how much it affects my life,” Deb says. “Because of my RLS, I’d stopped doing things in the evening. Any time I had to sit quietly for an extended period of time, I’d have to swallow pills to make it tolerable. It also made me uncomfortable sitting near strangers on long overseas flights – wiggling my legs while those sitting next to me attempted to sleep made the long flights miserable for all of us.” Deb began experiencing the pronounced feelings of agitation and discomfort in her legs, which she calls “the fidgets,” that are commonly diagnosed as symptoms of RLS, in her early 50s. “Within a year of when the fidgets started, my husband would be getting his sleep interrupted because I’d be up and down all night, walking and twitching,” she recalls. Although Deb’s husband tried to ease her symptoms by massaging her legs, it didn’t always help. “Most of the time I’d be rubbing my feet together, but I’ve also had nights where I was literally kicking one leg into the air, straight up,” she says. She estimates that her RLS symptoms have been this severe for nearly 15 years. When she first started...

“Relaxis has been a lifesaver.” – Mindi T.

For Mindi T., dealing with her Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) symptoms was a race against the clock — every night.  Making herself fall asleep early enough before the attacks started was the only way she avoided nightly discomfort. “It was like clockwork.  Every night before 9 or 10 pm, my legs would be jumpy and I’d get pains. I’d need to keep stretching and moving them,” she recalls.  “My husband would say, ‘Stop fidgeting.’  But moving was the only thing that made me feel better.” Mindi first started experiencing RLS symptoms years ago, but in the last five years, “RLS started taking over my life,” with the uncomfortable feelings in her legs – and occasionally in her arms – becoming a nightly event. “My RLS was debilitating. I’d dread going to sleep or going to a movie. I’d have to leave the theatre, because it’s distracting to others when you’re constantly moving your legs back and forth,” she explains. Traveling for work became tortuous because she couldn’t sit comfortably in airplanes for any length of time.  “Airplanes were horrible because I needed to move around and that wasn’t allowed,” she says. Mindi was adamant about not taking drugs, so she suffered with her RLS symptoms for hours every night before she could sleep. “I didn’t want to take any pills, especially anything that could affect my central nervous system; I didn’t want to deal with that,” she says.  Instead, she tried over-the-counter pain medication, hot pads and other “home remedies,” but nothing brought relief – until she learned about the Relaxis pad from a friend who knew about her...

“Getting my life back thanks to Relaxis” – Gayle S.

I’ve had Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) for more than 40 years. Having Restless Legs causes a lot of anxiety.  You’re always so frightened that your legs are going to act up.  When you tell people you have Restless Legs, they don’t understand that although it’s not a pain in the normal definition, RLS is an intolerable sensation that can drive you insane. Once an RLS attack starts, I have to move my legs to get relief, but it only helps for about 30 seconds, so I have to start moving my legs again and again.  Every time it happens, you wonder, “is it going to be a good night or a bad night?” My life started to be centered around my RLS; every decision was based on the time of day and what I was going to be doing.  Because sitting is the worst position for me, driving and flying were both terrible.  I rarely ate in restaurants, because if I had an attack I’d have to get up every few minutes and walk around, and I hadn’t attended a movie in decades. I was in my 20s when I first went to the doctor for my symptoms.  He wasn’t familiar with RLS, so I was told I was just experiencing “stress” and that I needed to learn how to relax.  My physician prescribed Codeine to help me sleep, and since then I’ve taken a lot of other medications to treat my RLS attacks, including Gabapentin, Clonazepam, and Pramipexole. I initially felt some relief from these medications, but I still had RLS episodes and I became more and more...

How I Fought Back Against Restless Legs Syndrome

RLS the Thief Restless Legs Syndrome snuck up on me.  Like a lot of adults over 40 (especially after having kids) I love to sleep, but RLS slowly stole it away from me. The first time I experienced RLS, it was a very unassuming, minor sensation that the weight of a comforter relieved.  Occasionally, over weeks and months I noticed a need to lie on my side. After rolling onto the annoyed side (usually my right hip and thigh), I’d  be able to drift off. Over the next couple of years, the need to lie on my side to relieve the odd sensation in my legs got more frequent.  It wasn’t long before I graduated to the pounding-my-leg-with-the-bottom-of-my-fist technique. Soon I had to repeat the fist-pounding more than once.  It wasn’t long before I’d wake up after briefly falling asleep and have to repeat the fist-pounding again to get back to sleep. Next came the “whole-leg shake.” When I went to bed and my RLS flared up it got to the point that I had to resort to lifting my whole leg in the air and wiggling and shaking it until the sensation died down enough to let me relax enough to get to sleep. Inevitably my attempts at sleep devolved into having to get out of bed and walk around.  Gone were the nights of simply pulling up the comforter or rolling onto my side.  However, as anyone with RLS knows, dealing with its symptoms using your own energy leads to the laws of diminishing returns: the more you roll over, pound, shake, wiggle and get out of bed...

5 Ways Restless Legs Syndrome Impacts Couples

February makes most of us think of valentines and hearts and the ones we love.  Have you ever wondered how RLS impacts love relationships? In late 2013 the Willis-Ekbom (formerly RLS) Foundation conducted a survey of over 1500 of it’s members and their spouses/partners.  The survey is called the “Patient Odyssey” survey. Among the results were 5 interesting findings about the impact of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) on sleep and relationships. Who were the couples? 90% of spouses/partners who responded have been in a committed relationship for more than 15 years. 80% of spouses/partners learned about their loved one’s RLS after getting married/entering into a civil union. Almost half- 46%- believe they should be involved in their partner’s decision regarding medication and half (50%) have encouraged their partner to ask their doctor for a different medication. 50% of spouses reported being “extremely” aware of their spouse’s RLS 20% of partners claim RLS has negatively impacted their relationships, however, 99% never considered ending the relationship because of RLS. 5 Ways RLS Impacts Sleep and Relationships A restful night’s sleep was the area most affected by RLS,  as reported by spouses and partners (85% and 38%, respectively). Most attention is typically focused on the RLS sufferer.  Clearly spouses are also missing out on a restful night’s sleep. 65% of patients and 24% of spouses/partners report being impacted by RLS three or more times a week. More than one-third of the week many couples are not getting the sleep they need. About 1/3 of patients and 1/3 of spouses/partners admit sleeping in a separate bed due to RLS. Sleeping in separate beds is a good fix for the partner,...